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Hydaspes (326 BC)

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Title
Hydaspes (326 BC)
Publisher
Scenario#
512
Scenario Description
By 318 BC the Successors had formed two competing alliances: the “Royalists” who claimed to fight to maintain the empire for Alexander’s infant sons, and a rival coalition that sought to claim their own independent kingdoms. The opposing Successor armies in Asia—one commanded by Antigonus, the other by Eumenes—met in battle at Paraitacene in 317 BC. Antigonus was by now the most powerful of the Diadochi, controlling most of Anatolia and the eastern satrapies. Eumenes had the backing of Alexander’s heirs and a large war chest, though the fact that he was a Greek and not a Macedonian was a major handicap. Antigonus fielded 28,000 infantry and 11,000 horse. Eumenes’ force of 35,000 foot and 6,000 horse included the veteran Silver Shields, who had fought with distinction in all of Alexander’s campaigns. The battle opened with Antigonus’ light horse attacking Eumenes’ right. This attack was wrecked by Eumenes’ heavy cavalry. Meanwhile in the center, the Silver Shields drove back Antigonus’ phalanx. Antigonus’ army was on the ropes when he pulled off a stroke that evened the score. He charged through a gap and was successful in routing Eumenes’ left flank. Both sides at this point were exhausted and returned to their camps. Antigonus claimed victory, but realistically the battle was a draw and a final resolution would not be reached until the armies met at Gabiene, a year later.
Scenario Date
326-BC
Location
Punjab Province, Pakistan
Battle Name
Battle of the Hydaspes
Battle Narrative
The Battle of the Hydaspes was fought in 326 BC between Alexander the Great and King Porus of the Paurava kingdom on the banks of the Jhelum River in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent. The battle resulted in a Greek victory and the surrender of Porus. Large areas of the Punjab between the Hydaspes (Jhelum) and Hyphasis (Beas) rivers were absorbed into the Alexandrian Empire, and Porus was reinstated as a subordinate ruler.
Introduction to Wikipedia Article
Narrative Source
Additional Information
Alexander The Great

Geolocation

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